Archive for the ‘Font-y Friday’ Category

Font-y Friday: Tuscans

June 6, 2009

friscoantiquedisplayrendezvousleking
figginstuscanlozamissionary
goldstandardoperahouse-1gringotuscan
de-louisvilleoldviccatacumba

Did you like the giant S from French Vogue Kirsten pointed out a few weeks ago? Us too!

This style of type is called Tuscan and it originated well before printing. Tuscans can be identified by bifurcation of the terminals — some have speculated that the bifurcation in the earliest examples may have been a typographic equivalent of the sign of the fish, an attempt to signify Christian faith in the letters themselves. Tuscans really hit their stride in the 19th century, during the age of handbills (each trying to outdo one another in typographic excess). This is when the form started mutating like crazy: the ends trifurcated, bulges or spikes erupted mid-stem, letters split into two, swashes and flourishes sprouted out.

Tuscans can be extended or condensed, rigid or expressive: some of the newer digital ones are hand-rendered. So versatile a type style, it’s a shame it’s rarely used contemporarily outside of circus- or western- themed work.

Credits & analysis, after the jump. (more…)

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Font-y Friday: Wayne White

May 29, 2009

maybenowillgettherespect

Todd Oldham has a book coming out in a few days, entitled Maybe Now I’ll Get the Respect I So Richly Deserve. It’s not about himself; he’s got respect aplenty after all. It’s about Wayne White, and honestly it’s a hilariously appropriate title for the first comprehensive monograph of an artist who’s been making awesome and original art for 30 years.

beautysembarrassin
Beauty’s Embarrassin!

whatditellya
What’d I Tell Ya?

His M.O. for the last decade has been basically painting giant, usually funny typography “realistically” into mass-produced “kitsch” landscape paintings — that is to say, using their perspective and lighting and often reflections and gravity too. This, years before things like Panic Room‘s opening titles made a trend of floating type in physical perspective, or for that matter before indie artists made upcycling/overpainting found art cool.

Oh, and he used to do sets for Pee Wee’s Playhouse, and directed Peter Gabriel’s video for “Big Time” — possibly the best video ever. Several more paintings [PG-13 for language], and the Big Time video (because we both know it’s been too long) after the jump.

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Font-y Friday: Rubik’s Cube Font Generator

May 22, 2009

I thought this was so cool, it just begged to be a second Font-y Friday.

For the assignment, “Produce a visual representation for the word ‘Move’,” Jas Bhachu created a rubber stamp set that can be used in varying combinations to create type. I love the packaging and instruction booklet too.

I wish it were available to purchase, because I really wanted to buy one for Owen (he was always a huge fan of using the letterpress equivalent when setting metal type).

cube-in-package

cube

instructions_1

instructions_2

poster

via Design Observer

Font-y Friday: Upright Scripts

May 22, 2009

Scripts, love ’em or hate ’em? Certainly a lot of them seem stuffy or old-fashioned, but, there are certain styles that still look fabulous after all these years. We’d like to look at one of our favorite subsets of script, the upright. Whether inspired by the Nineteenth-century French model or the mid-century modern craze for brush-written uprights, we can’t resist the charm of this style.

They are enjoying a recent resurgence in popularity, fueled largely by the efforts of superstar typographers Alejandro Paul and House Industries, both of whom have revived mid-century styles and made their own new faces. Here are thirteen of our favorites; credits after the jump.

upright__0001_Studio-Sable
upright__0002_Studio-Swing
upright__0000_Cocktail-Shaker
upright__0003_HouseLeagueNight
upright__0004_EdScript
upright__0005_TyoUpright
upright__0006_Glengary
upright__0007_Cartoleria
upright__0008_Pendulum
upright__0009_Fling

upright__0010_Mousse-Script
upright__0011_Alphaluxe
upright__0012_Peregroy
upright__0013_Uplink

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Font-y Friday: BKLYN type

May 15, 2009

Brooklyn_newcastle
brooklyn_greenpoint
brooklyn_haitian
brooklyn_momashow

1. Negative space typography remaining on the facade of an old fabric warehouse.

2. Fabulous awning-side metal letters on a Hotel in the Besties’ neighborhood – note that not only does Greenpoint turn around its curve, but Square actually tilts up a bit to fit as well.

3. Handpainted sign for a Haitian Baptist church with both blackletter and sans serif lettering. I love the mix of careful, studied shapes and disregard for details: the wild line weights and spacing letter to letter in “New,” the awkward sans “S.”

4. Subway poster for Mira Schendel show at the MOMA. We saw this poster on our final day in NY, but didn’t end up seeing the show. The poster made us pretty excited though (this is totally in the vein of some of our faves: Martin Venezky and Simon Evans).

We saw a lot of beautiful typography walking around New York, and it made us want to snap more photos around more often, because it’s really just a matter of paying attention: we have urban type this good in San Francisco too after all!

Font-y Friday

May 8, 2009

lolita

lolita2

This French Vogue font is art to me (found via Lolita).

Font-y Friday

May 1, 2009

font-friday

font-friday-fun

Having fun with the alphabet while at work!

Font-y Friday: “Unchanged since 2002. Now completely new.”

April 24, 2009

In case this is the font-iest of blogs you read, let me be the first to break it to you that Typographica is back! Their opening salvo, a return of the “Oscars of type Design,” their Favorite Typefaces of the year feature (see also 2004, 2005, 2006 and 2007 entries), is terrific and their new layout marvelous.

This is one of a handful of blogs that were in my very first blog bookmarks folder, that inspired me since waaaay back in the day. I know I teased them for not updating (and url vagaries) in my eulogy of SpeakUp and now I feel like crap about it. But as Stephen Coles writes in his very read-worthy note about the relaunch [please note that his links in this passage constitute the A-list of type blogs/forums today! Bookmark’m!]

It wasn’t just that our attention was diverted — other type bloggers took the reins and did it better, more beautifully and comprehensively, with more brains, more fervor, and more expertise. And, of course, there’s really no reason to go anywhere else to discuss type with knowledgeable peers than Typophile.

The new typographica, then, is not trying to compete with its supercharged grandchildren as another type blog, but as a “vehicle for typeface recommendations and reviews.” I couldn’t be more excited. Four of our favorites from this year’s favorites list (other than Archer that we already established is next on our must-have list!) … after the jump.

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Font-y Friday: fantastic clothing and accessory finds for type lovers

April 17, 2009

1_kern-rings1_epershand-necklace

2_ketchup-and-mustard2_baseline

3_helvwomsale409_213_futura-bold

4_swash-buckle4_kern-sweatshirt

troy-shirt-cropped15_green-type-shirt

Row 1:
This Kern ring set from plastique* was the inspiration for this week’s Font-y Friday. These rings are so geeky, but I think they are hysterical. They remind me of the Veer sweatshirt which I have always wanted, but still don’t have.

Owen bought me this Epershand Necklace from Isette during a fit of etsy shopping a few weeks ago. Each time I wear it, I get a ton of compliments on it. (In case you are wondering, ephersand is the Scots and Scotish English word for ampersand).

Row 2:
Lorem Ipsum “Ketchup and Mustard” shirt from The Select Series at Threadless.com. Almost any shirt with this classic greeked text phrase would be a hit with us, but this one is executed perfectly in streams of ketchup and mustard.

In a similar script, with a tagline that gets funnier with each line, there’s also the “My Baseline is lower than yours….much lower…” shirt from Workerman.

Row 3:
My appreciation of Helvetica has grown hugely since watching Helvetica. Show your love for this classic typeface by wearing this Helvetica Neue Descending tank from typography shop.

Futura Bold necklace from This is Star Jewelry. Owen says, “It’s one cmd-i away from being the perfect accessory to wear to a Barbara Kruger exhibit.”

Row 4:
The Swash Buckle and Kern Sweatshirt from veer.com; Veer has a bunch of great products for the discerning type nerd — these are just two of our favorites.

Row 5:
I bought Owen this Personalized Typography T-shirt from Enzyme Press for Christmas last year. It calls out the typographic terminology of your chosen word (baseline, counter, x-height etc) and you can choose from a variety of typefaces, shirt and ink colors.

Great screenprinted Typography shirt from stiksel. Owen bought a handkerchief from her the other day; it’s pretty fantastic too.

Font-y Friday: Contemporary Type Abundance

April 10, 2009

There’s been a trend in the last few years dubbed maximalism. We’re particular fans of how it manifests calligraphically and typographically. Here’s some of the finest, and six words about each:

Ray Fenwick
fenwick
Words and pictures both very good.

Marian Bantjes
bantjes
We have one; it’s laser-cut awesomeness.

Jessica Hische
jhirsche
This will be a tshirt soon.

Si Scott
siscott
Pen in hand, makes his mark.

Niels “Shoe” Meulman
shoe
calligraffiti inventor. Yep, how it sounds.

Seb Lester
seb1
Silver on black plike. Pretty rad.

Yulia Brodskaya
yulia
OMG that’s quilling? That’s insane yo.

Font-y Friday: Splendid Slabs

April 3, 2009

zapatarosewod archer_sampleclarendon freightapex girardthe_serif

Owen and I are big fans of slab serifs (and clarendons, for those who make the distinction) — they feel simultaneously classic and contemporary, and often feel fresher than a sans serif. Here are a few of our favorites; many of these typefaces are also available at MyFonts which we think is a great site.

Row 1:
Zapata
— An absurdly extended clarendon that is fun without looking too goofy.

Rosewood — I remember seeing Rosewood Fill (without the circusy outline) for the first time in 1998 and thinking it was awesome. Sadly, since then it has been used to death and we kind of avoid it.

Row 2:
Archer
— Archer is at the top of our fonts-we-want list. You can see it put to great use all over Martha Stewart’s brand. (It was initially commisioned of H&FJ for Martha Stewart Homes)

Clarendon Text — We bought this cut of Clarendon — which has been regularized a bit to make it work for text — for a book we designed about the Center for Land Use Interpretation‘s residency in Houston. The lovely brown highway signs that mark national parks are set in Clarendon (or were until recently) and it has a good “Texas look,” so it seemed a perfect fit.

Row 3:
Freight Micro — Previously on top of our fonts-we-want list; now on top of the fonts-we’ve-bought list. The angles on the italics are beautiful and unexpected — and basically just pretty frickin’ awesome.

Apex Serif — The slab serif of the Apex family (Apex Sans, Apex Serif and Apex New), it’s one of our old favorites. Until recently, we felt it was a secret from the world — I guess the party’s over now that Best Buy has started using Apex New on their signage, store circulars and website.

Row 4:
Girard Slab — The latest slab to draw our attention, it has lots of great ligatures and looks like it would be a lot of fun to work with.

The Serif — Luc de Groot’s superfamily Thesis outdoes all contenders in sheer volume; there’s the original sans, serif and mix, each in eight weights, small caps and italics. Since 2000 he’s contiuned with it, adding some new weights and a mono-spaced version. Quantity aside, The Serif is quite beautiful, and stays so from light to black.

Font-y Friday: Japan

March 26, 2009

casio_tokyo_stamps2

casio_tokyo_direction-copy

So, we went to Japan a year ago with our friends and RISD classmates Tim, John and Alex. Three graphic designers, an architect and a uh fashion designer/graphic designer/architect. For those of you who are one or more of these things, take it from me: Japan is so frickin’ awesome.

We went around taking pictures of everything because seriously everything was so rad. We shot manhole covers. We shot shrines that seemed more picturesque than possible. And being designers we took pictures of a lot of type. On this, our second installment of font-y Friday, we’d like to show you a few.

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